Lets Go Brandon Meme: This is where the viral meme originates

Let’s Go Brandon Meme: You might be wondering who Brandon is and why so many people are supporting him if you’ve recently heard folks screaming “Let’s go, Brandon!” or spotted someone wearing a shirt or hat with the seemingly-jovial slogan.

The term isn’t truly endorsing a man named Brandon in this circumstance. Instead, it’s a euphemism for “F*** Joe Biden” that many conservatives use instead of saying “F*** Joe Biden.”

On Oct. 2, race car driver Brandon Brown won his maiden NASCAR Xfinity Series race while being interviewed by NBC reporter Kelli Stavast. Some in the crowd can be heard yelling “F*** Joe Biden!” in the background, though Stavast states in her broadcast that “you can hear the chants from the crowd, ‘Let’s go, Brandon!’.

It’s unclear whether Stavast misheard what the audience was saying or sought to distort the message on purpose.

Lets Go Brandon Meme: This is where the viral meme originates

In any case, the slogan “Let’s go, Brandon!” swiftly spread among conservative groups and is still used as a substitute for the outright obscenity directed at President Biden, even among members of Congress.

Rep. Jeff Duncan of South Carolina, a Republican, was spotted wearing a “Let’s Go, Brandon” face mask on Thursday. “The American people are furious,” Duncan captioned a photo of himself wearing the mask on Facebook. Duncan continued his message by criticising the Biden administration’s immigration policies, vaccine mandates, and the current state of inflation in the United States.

Another Republican, Florida Rep. Bill Posey, closed a speech on the House floor the week before with a “Let’s go, Brandon!” and a fast fist pump, expressing his displeasure with the Biden administration’s programme and legislation.

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, who is no stranger to memes, added to the conversation when he shared a photo from Game 2 of the World Series with another Houston Astros fan holding a sign that reads “LET’S GO BRANDON” in large letters.

It’s also spreading outside of Congress. People have also used the phrase as the basis for a number of compositions. On Friday, a Southwest Airlines pilot used the words to end a flight. The airline is launching an internal inquiry into the event, according to the company.

Lets Go Brandon Meme: This is where the viral meme originates

The phrase is “shareable and flexible,” according to independent researcher Hampton Stall, and can be used in public in “way[s] that calling out the president cannot.”

Stall told NPR’s Weekend Edition that “Let’s go, Brandon!” received a lot of support from alternative right-wing media and individuals, in addition to being easily circulated.

While it’s likely that the more explicit term will be prohibited by social media sites and search engines, Stall claims that the meme version will not.

“They weren’t going to limit the search term,” Stall explains. “And I believe that is probably correct. There’s a distinction to be made between appeals for violence and winks like the ‘Let’s Go, Brandon’ meme.”

Lets Go Brandon Meme: This is where the viral meme originates

“Let’s go, Brandon” isn’t the first president-related meme to go viral, nor is it the first time a president has had to deal with profanity.

President Barack Obama was in power when social media’s influence began to grow, allowing racist pictures and remarks to spread quickly online.

When former President Donald Trump was in power, the word “F*** Trump” was frequently seen on signs and clothes. Stall believes he’s seeing the same phenomenon now, exactly as that term was capitalised on.

“People who are seizing the moment and selling can make a lot of money,” Stall says.

If people remember this meme in the future, Stall believes it will have reached the stage where most people will understand what others are saying when they say “Let’s go, Brandon,” much as many people remember Trump’s “covfefe” error turned joke.

“I think it’s passed the stage where enough people in the mainstream political audience in the United States have heard it to remember it,” he says. “It just might not have the same lasting power [as covfefe],” says the author.

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